VFI PRODUCES HISTORIC LIVE WEBCAST OF SCUTTLING OFF KEY WEST, FLORIDA

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Up-Close Real-Time Video Shot Only 800 Yards from Sinking USNV Vandenberg  June 3, 2009 – 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Contact: Dee McHenry, Producer


Last week, Valeo Films broadcast an Internet first:  never-before-seen live footage of a ship being scuttled offshore.  The retired USNV Gen. Hoyt Vandenberg was sunk on May 27th seven miles off the coast of Key West, FL for the purpose of establishing an artificial reef.


“To our knowledge, a live wi-fi feed of a scuttling had never been broadcast on the Web before,” said producer Dee McHenry of Valeo Films. “The filming took place miles out to sea aboard a pitching vessel only eight hundred yards from the sinking ship, and the most exciting part was that thousands of people from 86 different countries had a front row seat at www.SinkTheVandenberg.com.”


Earlier in the week, Valeo Films (VFI) was designated official video provider of Artificial Reefs of the Keys (ARK) online content related to the sinking of the Vandenberg, a decommissioned military communications vessel built in 1943. ARK, the non-profit organization founded over a decade ago to manage the sinking of the vessel, also granted VFI exclusive use of the website in order to present Vandenberg-related online videos to a global audience over the course of the next year.


Initially, the web site served as a porthole for live streaming footage of the actual scuttling of the ship.  The unprecedented video was shot from a private vessel located inside the safety perimeter just abeam of the Vandenberg.  Civilian vessels were kept a mile distance from the sinking ship.


“In its day, the Vandenberg utilized cutting edge communications technology while tracking missiles and spacecraft,” said David Ulloa, president of Valeo Films.  “It is fitting that on the day of her sinking, VFI broke through communication barriers by webcasting her scuttling live from sea.”


At 523 feet in length and weighing in at 17,000 tons, the Vandenberg is the second largest artificial reef in the world.  To sink the ship, cutting charges blasted holes in the lower decks of the environmentally-cleansed vessel; when water pressure pushed the plates inward, she flooded and sank in less than two minutes, with her hull coming to rest in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary near Key West at about 150 feet.


Ulloa noted, “Most demolition teams appear on site to destroy or remove an object; on May 27th, they put one in place. The demolition was both the end of something old and the beginning of something new.”


The Vandenberg’s presence will help divert fishing pressure and diving stresses away from natural reefs near the ship.  The Fish and Wildlife Commission estimates that the vessel's underwater life span of at least 100 years will contribute stable, long-term habitat for scores of marine fish species, and provide exceptional diving and fishing opportunities for Florida residents and visitors from around the world.


Ulloa is pleased with the widespread community support his production team encountered. "There were a lot of positive, forward-thinking people doing whatever they could do make this project happen," he said.  “We are honored to have worked alongside them.”



For more information about this project, go to www.SinkTheVandenberg.com or www.valeofilms.com

Valeo FIlms Inc., PO Box 250, Orange Lake, FL 32681   Phone (352) 591-4714  email: info@valeofilms.com


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